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Apple Watch: One Day In

My Apple Watch arrived yesterday (42mm space gray Sport). There are plenty of reviews out there, repeating much of the same information. I'm not going to offer another one of those, but I will offer you a bulleted list of thoughts and reflections after wearing it (except when sleeping and showering--although, evidently, the latter is okay) for almost a full day.

If you do want to read a "good" review of the Apple Watch, I recommend Walt Mossberg's post at Re/code, "A Month With the Apple Watch: Does It Pass the Test of Time?" because he's actually been using it every day for an entire month, which is something very few reviewers can claim. And I also recommend all the Apple Watch coverage at iMore. There you will find not only reviews, but also "how to" articles written by people who are enthusiastically using the Apple Watch in a variety of contexts.

One friend asked if I was going to do an unboxing video. I was not interested in doing that because there are undoubtedly thousands of those out there, and I didn't know what I could possibly add. I did take a few photos while unboxing the Apple Watch, mainly for myself and interested family members, but if you are interested, too, you can find those photos here.

Here are my thoughts and reflections, one day in:

  • My order was in within 10 minutes after midnight PST on April 10, but it did not make the April 24 ship date. Evidently, the 42mm space gray Sport was the most popular Apple Watch ordered--the "nerd gear of choice," as some have suggested. Mine was promised to be delivered between May 13 and 27; it actually arrived on May 12.

  • UPS tracking stated that the Apple Watch would arrive between 2:30 and 6:30 PM. It arrived at 11 AM. Since it required a signature, I did not have to sit at the house all day, but what if I had been aiming to come back at 2:30?

  • Evidently, I had not watched any unboxing videos because I didn't realize what kind of packaging the Apple Watch would arrive in. I don't know about the stainless steel or gold Apple Watches, but the aluminum Sport comes in a 3 lb. box that is 15" long (see my photos). I had already noticed on UPS tracking how heavy the package was--2.2 lbs stated there. And this was for a watch? Gold is heavier than the aluminum; did they send the wrong one? Did they send me multiple watches by mistake? The box is as long as it is because the watch is laid out flat rather than wrapped in a circle like watches I've purchased in the past. Granted, the package also carried the charger, but it's actually the packaging itself that is so heavy. I kept the box, and as I put it on top of a bookshelf last night, I noticed how heavy it was even without the watch and charger inside. The Apple Watch packaging may not win any of the earth-friendly praise that Apple has received lately.

  • Minor issue, but there was no Apple sticker in the watch packaging. I would have thought there would have at least been a quarter (as in 25¢)-sized Apple logo, but no.

  • The Apple Watch came with a 75% charge on the battery. I started using it soon after 11 AM, and by 8 PM, the battery was down to 10%, so I put it on the charger. I'll chalk this up to heavier than normal use having it the first day. At least that's what I hope. [side note: I wish Apple would invest a few of their extra billions of dollars into battery technology. If they could make devices that would stay charged for days or even weeks at a time, the world would beat a path to their door.]

  • In normal wear, the Apple Watch screen is black for the purpose of saving battery. It kinda reminds me of the original digital watches from the 70s that stayed dark, requiring the wearer to press a button to see the time. The face of the Apple Watch is activated by wrist action, but it seems very similar--at least for telling the time (this is a watch, right?) to where we were four decades ago. Again, if Apple will do something about battery life, maybe the screen could remain lit up all the time.

  • Speaking of battery, while there's been lot of talk about having to charge the Apple Watch daily, I discovered that the battery on my iPhone ran down faster than usual, no doubt because of a continuous Bluetooth connection between the phone and the watch all day. I keep a vehicle charger in my truck and another on my desk, but users should be prepared for not just worrying about the watch's battery life.

  • When I initially set up the Apple Watch, I was asked if I wanted to install all the apps on my iPhone that also had Apple Watch components. I said yes which resulted in way too many apps for what I need. Later, I pulled most of these off. I can see the possible use of Skype, but I do I really need a OneDrive app on my Apple Watch? Do I need the Fandango app? It's cool that these are possible, but just not so necessary for my purposes. Once I removed most of the Apple Watch apps (you can't remove the native Apple apps, of course), it was much easier to navigate the app icons.

  • On a related note, I have also turned off most notifications, with a few exceptions, from the Apple Watch. In 2013, I had a Pebble Watch for about four weeks. I was intrigued by the technology, but the constant vibration as the watch mirrored every notification on my iPhone drove me crazy. Honestly, in regard to both apps and notifications, I think it's probably a good idea to start with everything--the entire firehose--and then determine what you really need and remove the rest.

  • Initially as I pared down what I actually wanted to have on the watch, I left text messages and email in place. By last night, I had removed email notifications. For me, email notifications don't serve much purpose. You can't actually reply to them. The email app itself remains, so you can check email manually if you want.

  • Evidently, I sit too much because the Apple Watch tells me to stand every now and then--I'm guessing about once an hour, but I haven't timed it. Our pastor is on a sabbatical, but I told the fellow who is filling in next Sunday that if he sees me standing up in the middle of his sermon, he's gone too long.

  • As others have said, it's the fitness aspects of the Apple Watch that may be one of its greatest benefits. There's no doubt that I'm not active enough, but the watch sets realistic individualized goals for each day in regard to movement and exercise. There's a desire to try to meet these goals--at least for me. And supposedly, if I start meeting my goals on a regular basis, the Apple Watch will raise the bar of expectation. Nice.

  • Let me say a word about wristwatches in general: I've lost almost every wristwatch I've owned (I need an Apple Pocket Watch that will stay tethered to me). Here's what happens: I get uncomfortable with this foreign thing on my wrist, so I take it off--usually without even consciously knowing what I'm doing. I've left watches in restaurants, classrooms, churches, parks, and all kinds of places. Therefore, other than pocket watches--again these would be tethered to me, I've tried to buy inexpensive watches the last few years knowing there was a possibility they would disappear. What makes matters worse is that although I usually wear watches fairly loosely on my wrist, the Apple Watch requires a more snug presence so that the sensors fully work. I really try not to think about it! Therefore, Kathy has forbidden me on threat worse than death to take off my Apple Watch. I admit, even now as I type this, I have a great desire to take it off and set it beside me. However, I'm trying to tough it out. It only takes something three weeks to become a habit, right? In the meantime, I'm afraid the palm rest of my MacBook Pro is going to get scuffed because I don't keep my hands raised like Mrs. Smith taught me in my high school typing class.

  • In Mossberg's report that I linked to at the top of this post, he complained that the speaker is not good enough for phone calls on the watch. No offence to Mr. Mossberg, but his older ears probably aren't as good as they used to be. I have taken two calls so far on the Apple Watch, and I thought the experience was not only good enough, but also darn convenient. I don't have to stop what I'm doing and hold onto my phone. The speaker is not the same quality as the phone, but I could hear fine. And when I talked to Kathy over the Apple Watch last night, she didn't even know I was doing anything differently until I told her that I was talking to her over the watch. Then she expressed disappointment that she was not the first person I talked to over the watch (the first call I engaged in over the Apple Watch was with Time Warner Cable when they called me; I figured that if the quality wasn't good, they deserved what they got).

  • I have a hunch that the interface of the watch will be completely different in two years. It's not that it's bad now (but there is room for improvement), but widespread use will bring refinement and change.

  • With all the "fashion" talk surrounding the Apple Watch, I don't look at my space gray aluminum Apple Watch Sport and think of it with any connection to fashion. Maybe if you had the gold Edition, but I don't know. It still seems a bit thick, though not as thick as I first feared. Again, two years will make a big difference, and I would predict (as many others have before me) that later versions of the Apple Watch will be much thinner. They may be more like fashion accessories then. If you're holding out for the time being, I'd say wait for the thinner version that is surely to come. And then spring for at least the stainless steel version with the assumption that it will be supported for years to come.

  • Which brings up another thing--there's has been lots of talk about the difference between a gold Apple Watch Edition, costing $10,000 or more and a traditionally expensive timepiece such as something from Rolex or Tag Hauer. These traditional time pieces are designed to last long term and can be passed down from generation to generation. Obviously, a device with an operating system at its center is probably not going to be passed down across generations. I would predict this, however: although the operating system on the watch will continue to be improved, I believe Apple will continue to support each iteration of the Apple Watch long term. There will be a way for the watch to still function years from now. Really, I believe they have to plan for that if they want to be successful as a watch maker.

  • While I don't think of the Apple Watch as a fashion accessory, it definitely looks nicer than the Pebble Watch I briefly used a couple of years ago and the Android Wear watches that I have not used. This is probably the best of class in its field, but there's still a lot of room to grow by all smartwatch designers.

  • The black "fluoroelastomer" (a fancy kind of rubber, evidently) band is of a nicer quality than what I anticipated. However, I still want to find a cheap, 3rd party knockoff of the red band that Apple sells only with the 18-karat Edition. 3rd party bands will be the new thing and will no doubt explode onto the Apple Watch accessory scene, which will also unfortunately bring things like the hideous Apple Watch cases I've already seen. In regard to inexpensive 3rd party bands, consider my wife, Kathy. She loves watches and accessorizes the color of watches with what she's wearing. She has not jumped onto the idea of an Apple Watch yet because she would not want to be tied down to one accessory. However, if she could easily change out bands (and Apple has made the ability to switch them quite simple to do), then she might be interested.

  • There's been discussion that there's no "killer app" yet for the Apple Watch. This is true, but Mossberg dismisses this as a non-issue. Nevertheless, now that millions of people are using the device, I believe we will discover some extremely beneficial use case that hasn't even been realized yet. The health aspects alone may be the killer app. The idea of the quantified self is interesting to me (although it also seems narcissistic at some level) as long as I don't have to go to great effort to record my own data. So, for instance, I have no desire to figure out how many calories I'm burning through in a day, but if a device will keep up with that for me, great.

  • Once I got the hang of it, texting over the watch is pretty easy, and Siri's ability to dictate my voice is much improved. But in the first attempt, I accidentally sent an audio version of my message, complete with my instructions for punctuation. Embarrassing.

  • One more very important issue: distracted driving. I thought that having the Apple Watch on my wrist, up on the steering wheel at eye level, would be a convenient way to respond to a text that would not be a distraction. Not true. If anything, trying to look at anything more than time on my watch is an even greater distraction than interacting with a phone because of the smaller focus space and less-familiar interface. As always, keep your eyes on the road and take care of texts, emails, and whatever else after you have parked.

So there's my initial rundown. Maybe I'll come back and update my thoughts after the first month or so. What has your experience been like? Be certain to add your questions, thoughts, comments, or rebuttals in the Comments Section.





No, this is not an advertisement for summer archaeology opportunities. 

Essenes, Warren's Shaft, the Temple Mount, Dome of the Rock, the Foundation Stone, Well of Souls, and a red heifer. This is not the normal stuff of network television. Last week, the television show, Dig, ended its first season run of 10 episodes on the USA Network. When the show was first advertised, I was under the impression that it was going to be a miniseries, but evidently, it's going to be an anthology show--changing characters and contexts each season. 

The show centers around Peter Connelly (Jason Isaacs), an FBI agent stationed in Jerusalem after facing a recent family tragedy. While investigating a murder, Connelly stumbles across a conspiracy by an extremist group composed of both Christians and Jews whose common agenda could have literal apocalyptic ramifications if successful.

Now, if the above description sounds too sensationalistic, what I really appreciated about the show was that it really did not resort to sensationalism to entertain. Think of it as a DaVinci Code without the preposterous conspiratorial history and animosity toward organized religion. Most of the the series was filmed on location in Israel, and most importantly, archaeology was treated seriously. And if you want to brush up on your Hebrew, biblical or modern, there's lots of it--some with subtitles, some without.

I don't want to give away too many details, but I do recommend watching the first season. You can find most or possibly all episodes on USA's Dig website, and it is also available on iTunes. I have no doubt it will eventually be available on Netflix. There is some adult content that is not central to the storyline, so unfortunately, I cannot recommend it for the whole family.

See also the review from Biblical Archaeology Society, "TV Series 'Dig' Delivers Drama."


Questions, thoughts, comments, rebuttals? Leave them in the comments section. 



Chronology in Haggai

Russian icon of Haggai, 18th century (Iconostasis of Kizhi monastery, Karelia, Russia). Source: Wikipedia.Our Bible study today at church is taken from the Book of Haggai, one of the Minor Prophets. I admit that it's been a while since I have studied Haggai, and one aspect that really intrigued me about the book is all the very specific references to dates. Consider these examples from the HCSB:

“In the second year of King Darius, on the first day of the sixth month, the word of the LORD came through Haggai the prophet to Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel, the governor of Judah, and to Joshua son of Jehozadak, the high priest:” (Hag 1:1)

“They began work on the house of Yahweh of Hosts, their God, on the twenty-fourth day of the sixth month, in the second year of King Darius.” (Hag 1:14–15)

“On the twenty-first day of the seventh month, the word of the LORD came through Haggai the prophet:” (Hag 2:1)

“On the twenty-fourth day of the ninth month, in the second year of Darius, the word of the LORD came to Haggai the prophet:” (Hag 2:10)

“Consider carefully from this day forward; from the twenty-fourth day of the ninth month, from the day the foundation of the LORD’s temple was laid; consider it carefully.” (Hag 2:18)

“The word of the LORD came to Haggai a second time on the twenty-fourth day of the month:” (Hag 2:20)

There are similar references to dates elsewhere in the Bible, but I can't think of any other biblical writing that has so many chronological markers in such a short amount of space--two chapters in modern versified editions. This is wonderful for the reader because a very exact chronology of events is fairly easy to trace through the writing. I found a number of commentaries and Bible dictionaries that offered chronologies of Haggai, often including his contemporary, Zechariah, another prophet known for detail in dating events. Here is a representative example:

Screen capture above from Accordance
(E. Ray Clendenen, “Haggai, Book Of.” Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary.
Nashville, TN: Holman Bible Publishers, 2003, p. 701.). 

Although there's some room for error in regard to the years offered above, such attention to detail seems to be more of a modern practice than an ancient one, with most biblical dating references usually focusing on distance from certain events as opposed to the specificity of month and date as offered by Haggai and Zechariah. It's too bad we don't have chronological markers this specific for other portions of the Bible, especially the events in the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, and the events of the early monarchy. If the biblical writers had offered a calendar to go along with their narratives, a great number of ongoing debates would be over before they began!

Questions? Thoughts? Comments? Rebuttals? Put them in the comments section!


This Week in Accordance (2015.05.09)

Here is my unofficial, off-the-clock rundown of everything new relating to Accordance from this past week. 

New Titles for the Accordance Library from InterVarsity Press

These titles were released and went on sale on Tuesday with introductory pricing. It's Saturday afternoon when I'm writing this, so if you want the discounts, you've got less than three days left. I read through a few articles in the Global Dictionary, and it looks really good. I enjoy reading other perspectives, regardless of whether or not I agree with them. I've been wanting to read Walton's book for a while, as well as his follow-up covering Gen 2-3, so I hope to curl up with my iPad and jump into the Lost World soon.

NIVAC Sale Ends at Midnight

This sale on the NIV Application Commentary series was in partnership with the publisher, Zondervan. It ran for two weeks on a schedule different than our normal sales. If you're reading this after the date of this post, and the link above doesn't work, forget it you missed it. And that's a shame because the sale brought the prices down to $7.99 per volume. 

Five New Videos

We released five new videos this week, some of which we haven't even had a chance yet to publicize. Nevertheless, since they are all public, I'll embed them here. 

First up, a short tutorial, Syncing Accordance Mobile with Dropbox. This is part of our Mobile Minute series that goes with our weekly newsletter (sign up here). 

Second, Dr. J (Tim Jenney) released episode #122 of the Lighting the Lamp podcast, in which he demonstrates How to Study a Topic in Accordance. 

The third and fourth videos are part of a 2013 Accordance Training Seminar held in Baltimore in November, 2013 (ETS/SBL week). Although they feature demonstrations of Accordance 10, everything here applies to Accordance 11 since the latter added features to what was already there. There will be more installments added to a new page at the Accordance website as we edit them. 

This first segment, led by Tim Jenney, gives a basic overview of Accordance.

The second segment, led by David Lang, offers a basic introduction to search commands and search symbols. 

Finally, the fifth video, just released today is another Accordance Mobile Minute segment. This one, primarily geared toward new users of our mobile app, shows off features of the Verse Chooser. 

Australian Training Seminars

We now have two free training seminars scheduled for Australia: 

  • Brisbane (May 16)
  • Sydney (June 13)

Go to our Training Seminars page to get more information and sign up for these seminars and others.

Upcoming Free Webinars for the Coming Week

We have two webinars on schedule for this week. The webinars use GoToMeeting and allow participants to directly interact with the instructor. 

  • Intermediate Searching in Accordance (Tues May 12, 6-7 PM, EDT)
  • Using the Atlas (Thurs May 14, 1-2 PM, EDT)

Sign up for these or other sessions at our Webinars page. Also check out recordings of past webinars on our Webinar Archives page.


Whew--it's been a busy week! If you have any questions, feel free to leave them in the comments.


What's the Surface Temperature? (Theotek Podcast #23)

In this morning's Theotek podcast, we discussed the new Surface 3 from Microsoft (both Kevin & I received ours this week). We also had a discussion on "best" computers for ministers and church secretaries. 

Questions? Thoughts? Comments? Rebuttals? Leave them in the comment section.


3 Reasons Apple Might Create Their Own Search Engine

Yesterday there was much stir in the tech press (see here, for instance) after Apple offered details on its much rumored web crawler known appropriately enough as "Applebot." Apple says the web crawler is merely for use with Siri and Spotlight. Nevertheless, this revelation has led to much speculation that Apple might actually be creating a search engine to rival Google. 

Although presumably Apple has the kind of massive data centers to back their own search engine, why would they want to do that? What would be the point? Could they possibly match what Google, the de facto search standard, is already doing? 

Well, there are at least three reasons for doing this I can think of off the top of my head. Here they are in order of significance.  

  1. Apple's own search engine would provide means to remove dependency on yet another Google service. Granted, Apple's own map service was nowhere near what Google Maps was, and it certainly got off to a very rocky start. But these days, it's fairly comparable--or at least good enough. In fact, millions of people use it every day and don't even realize they're using something that's not Google Maps. And maybe that's the point. An Apple search engine doesn't have to be as good as Google. It only has to be good enough. 
  2. Apple could provide its customers with ad-free search. Tim Cook has famously said that Apple's customers "are not the product." Google's services are supported through monetization of information gained through the habits of their users. Already Apple provides its users with a choice of search engines: Google, Yahoo, Bing and the lesser known Duck Duck Go. I've been using this last choice for nearly six months. I use it because of the four choices, Duck Duck Go is the only one that doesn't monetize my searches or even keep a record of them. How does it stack up? Just fine. Occasionally I have to use Google, but when I used Google, I occasionally had to use Bing. The point is that a search engine just needs to be good enough to be useful most of the time. 
  3. Apple creating its own search engine and making it the default choice on its devices will hurt Google financially. With Steve Jobs gone, no one at Apple is declaring "thermonuclear war" against Google anymore. Honestly, I doubt this is a reason that Apple would create its own search engine; but nevertheless, "Apple Search" (you heard it here first) as a default could seriously put a dent into Google's finances and threaten its position as king of search.

Google has become so dominant with internet search that even Microsoft has not been able to gain more than a minority share of searches on the internet. Apple controls the default settings of hundreds of millions of devices sold each year, so they could make a significant effort. But they may have no desire to become the top search engine on the internet. Apple likes to control the whole widget and not remain dependent on other companies. When it comes to search, they just need to be good enough. 

What are your thoughts? Does Apple have plan for their own search engine, or is this just a minor technology service for Apple devices. Leave your thoughts, questions, comments and rebuttals in the comments section. 



7 Quick Thoughts on Avengers: Age of Ultron (Minor Spoilers)

Kathy and I saw Avengers: Age of Ultron last Thursday night. I'm not offering a full review, but here are a few quick thoughts with some minor spoilers.

  • If there was ever a "What He Said" treatment of this movie for me, personally, it's David Betancourt's article at The Washington Post, "'Avengers: Age of Ultron':A fanboy's 11-point breakdown of the masterful sequel." I also appreciated Jessica Gibson's review at Christianity Today for her insights into the movie's treatment of the reality of evil in the world.

  • I'm not certain about the relationship between Bruce Banner (The Hulk) and Natasha Romanoff (Black Widow). I mean, what about poor Betty Ross?

  • I can't remember now where I saw this (my apologies for no link), but I read that director Joss Whedon is evidently a fan of ballet. In hindsight after seeing the movie, this definitely makes sense. Whedon likes to slow down expansive actions scenes so that the viewer can take a long look at everything going on at once. There's so much going on, in fact, that slow motion is the only way to begin to comprehend all the chararacters' actions at once. When I saw the first of these in the opening scenes of the movie, the word choreography came to mind.

  • At two hours and 21 minutes, the movie is quite full, but I've read elsewhere (again, I apologize for no link) that Whedon's original cut is somewhere around three and a half hours! No doubt ticket sales played a factor in the studio cutting it down over an hour (longer movies mean fewer showing, which means less money), but I really hope we get to see Whedon's entire vision for the movie one day in a Director's Cut Release.

  • I thought James Spader was perfect as Ultron. Having watched Spader on The Black Listfor the last two years (a role obviously taylor-made for him), I could even "see" Spader's facial expressions in the mechanical movements of Ultron's face.

  • Paul Bettany's portrayal of The Vision was wonderful, even though the character's origin was significantly altered from that in the comic books. I wish he had been in more of the movie. I also found it interesting that Kathy noticed the connection between The Vision and Wanda Maximoff (Scarlet Witch) even though she knows nothing of the characters' history together in the comic books.

  • Although Elizabeth Olson (Wanda Maximoff/Scarlet Witch) and Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Pietro Maximoff/Quicksilver) had wonderful chemistry together, I think I still prefer the style of motion for the character a bit better as it was portrayed by Evan Peters in X-Men: Days of Future Past. And for what it's worth, I find it regrettable that there are "rival" versions of these same characters in different movie franchises. The movies would be better if the studios would cooperate a bit more together on issues like this. At least we're going to see a shared Spider-Man.

What about you? What are your thoughts about the movie? Love it? Hate it? Leave your questions, thoughts, comments, and rebuttals in the comments section.


Received: 128 GB Surface 3

I was not in the market for a new Windows tablet, but when I had the opportunity to obtain a Surface 3 combo package (including keyboard and pen) at half price a few weeks ago, I found it difficult to pass up. 

Above: Accordance running on the Surface 3. 

Commercially released today, this is the 128 GB model with 4 GB of RAM (a lesser 64 GB/2 GB RAM model, too). Yes, I actually chose red as the color for the keyboard and matching pen; I've really been into red a lot lately. The Surface 3 has a lesser processor than the Surface Pro 3--a Quad-core Intel Atom x7-Z8700 processor to be exact--which is why it also costs less than the Surface Pro 3. Microsoft claims that "Surface 3 offers more than 80% of the performance of Surface Pro 3 with Intel Core i3 processor." 

I'll have a full review at some point in the near future. I haven't had much time to spend with the device yet, but it seems to be quite capable for most basic computing needs. One odd issue that I've confirmed with Kevin Purcell who also received a Surface 3 today: under heavy processing load, the battery charge of the Surface 3 may decrease even when plugged in. I'll explore this issue further for my upcoming review. 

In the meantime, here are a few more photos.

Above, the new matching red Surface 3 pen with the original Surface Pro 3 pen.


Questions, thoughts, comments, rebuttals? Leave 'em in the comments!



Theotek Podcast #22: What's New?

A few weeks ago I began taking part in the Theotek podcast with Kevin Purcell, Wes Allen, and Antoine J. Wright. This past week's (May 1) episode was a potpourri of topics: Apple Watch, Windows 10, and a live report from BibleTech from LaRosa Johnson.




Biblical Word for the Day: Shigionoth (שִׁגְיֹנוֹת)

I'm teaching on Habakkuk 3 at church this morning. Verse 1 reads

“A prayer of Habakkuk the prophet. According to Shigionoth” (Hab 3:1, HCSB)

What does Shigionoth (שִׁגְיֹנוֹת) mean? Well, Shigionoth is the plural of the Hebrew Shiggaion (שִׁגָּיוֹן), and it refers to a musical term that relates to how a psalm should be performed. The same term shows up in Psalm 7, for instance.

However, in trying to find out exactly how the direction of Shigionoth/Shiggaion should be understood, I ran into not a whole lot of agreement. Here are just two examples from a number of descriptions I found when consulting various Bible dictionaries in Accordance:

SHIGGAION (Heb. šiggāyôn),
SHIGIONOTH (šig̱yōnôṯ)
A term appearing in the superscription of Ps. 7 and in a plural form at Hab. 3:1, which is the superscription of a psalm (vv. 2–19). The term may indicate that these are songs to be performed in a lament or dirge style (cf. Akk. šegu, “lament”) or that their structure and performance are varied from part to part (cf. Heb. šāg̱â, “wander”).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible, s.v. “SHIGGAION SHIGIONOTH,” 1210.


SHIGGAION (Shı̆ gā′ ŏn) Transliteration of a Hebrew technical term used in psalm titles (Ps. 7; Hab. 3). Suggested translations include “frenzied” or “emotional.” Some think the basic meaning is “to wander” in reference to a wandering style of thought or melody or to the unconnected expressions of a lament.

Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary, s.v. “SHIGGAION,” 1486.

Based on the context of Habakkuk, the element of lament or dirge suggested from the Eerdmans Dictionary seems to make more sense, which is how I'm teaching it this morning.